65 Items for your First Aid Kit

Not just for your typical SHTF, or EOTWAWKI type events, but for any kind of emergency situation. These items can/will come in handy in a multitude of situations, and for the most part are over looked for a survival first aid kit. We learn more and more everyday what common, as well as not so common items can be used in an emergency / a survival situation. When you read through the list I can say with 99% certainty that the vast majority of you will say/think at least one of the following. ‘I never knew that could be used in that manner’ or ‘I need to add that to my first aid kit’ or ‘I already knew about that, just not in that way’. Knowledge is power, Power to the people!

  1. Hazardous Waste Garbage Bags: These red bags are clearly marked as “Bio-hazardous/Infectious Waste” and include a bio-hazard symbol.  They come in many sizes and can be used to discard bandages, compresses, needles, tissues, clothing, and all manner of contaminants.  They are perfect as a trash can liner for the sick room. Since disposition of hazardous medical supplies may not be immediate, it will be important to keep contaminants separated from the rest of the garbage; my plan is to take the sealed hazardous waste bags and double then triple bag then in hefty bags.
  2. Sneeze into the crook of your arm to avoid contaminating your hands
  3. Hemostatic Agent: These go under several brand names, like QuikClot, Celox, and HemCon. What they do is quickly cause the blood to clot, stopping the bleeding much faster. These are best used in large wounds where the risk of death from blood loss is high. These can be more expensive than other first aid items, but they literally can mean the difference between life and death in severe trauma.
  4. Putting toothpaste on a insect sting can stop the pain
  5. Baking soda is an excellent antacid
  6. Tongue Depressors: The main use for them is as a finger split. The best way to treat a broken or severely sprained finger is to immobilize it. They’re also good for kindling if you need to make a fire
  7. Eating activated charcoal will bind ingested chemicals and poisons, and can assist in keeping your body ingesting them any further.
  8. Aloe Vera gel takes the heat out of burns, but so does the sap of an Aloe plant, it is also used to help speed up the process of healing.
  9. Natural yogurt stops the irritation and clears vaginal thrush
  10. Natural yogurt takes the heat out of sunburn
  11. A strong magnet will draw metal to the surface of a wound
  12. Olive oil smothers head lice killing them. Repeat after 5 days
  13. Olive oil treats psoriasis and dry eczema preventing cracking
  14. Cling wrap is the ideal covering for burns
  15. Flexible Drinking Straws:  If you have ever been down for the count, you know how difficult it is to drink out of cup or bottle when you can barely hold your head up.  In addition, drinking from a straw is more sanitary in that after doing so, the straw can be disposed of in a hazardous waste bags; no washing required.
  16. Cinnamon sticks in a jar with water makes antiseptic mouthwash
  17. White vinegar treats fungal nail infection. 1 part vinegar 2 parts water
  18. Duct tape will hold a large wound together until you can deal with it
  19. Scrape stings out with an ATM card.  Pinching it out puts more venom in
  20. Sanitary towels make excellent pressure dressings
  21. Seal a sucking chest wound with a plastic bag fixed on 3 sides over the wound
  22. Clove oil relieves toothache
  23. Strong, cooled black tea relieves conjunctivitis
  24. Parsley stops bad breath and contains  masses of vitamin C and vitamin A
  25. Eggshell is the best form of calcium supplement
  26. Olive oil loosens solid earwax
  27. Tampons and Maxi-pads:  While using these for their normal role is one aspect, they also have uses in first aid. Tampons are good for plugging up puncture wounds and the pads make good dressings. Just make sure you get the non-scented type so you’re not injecting the scent chemical into the wound.
  28. Natural sugar can assist in healing wounds, just pour it on.
  29. Tampons work well to plug penetrating wounds
  30. Curved upholstery needles are good for suturing wounds
  31. Dental floss is a good substitute for suture material in emergencies.
  32. Toothpaste applied to a blister or cold sore will dry them up
  33. A patch of duct tape over a wart will kill it. Change patch daily.
  34. Cut toe nails straight across to prevent in growing and infection
  35. A small blob of softened candle wax can seal a tooth where a filling is lost
  36. Pleasant smells lift the spirit and enhance your mood
  37. Trace elements in homemade chicken soup does make you feel better
  38. Sniffing onions or vapour rub causes tears which washes debris from eyes
  39. Safety Pins:  While this seems like a common item found in first aid kits, you would be surprised at how many kits don’t have any. Not only can you hold bandages in place with these, but they are also good for digging out splinters. They’re safety design makes them easy to carry in your kit.
  40. Petroleum jelly seals grazes and stops bacteria entering the wound
  41. Keep a hand/foot dressing in place with a fingerless rubber glove
  42. Hold an arm/leg dressing in place with cut off piece of panty hose
  43. Strap a broken finger/toe with tape to an unbroken one next to it
  44. Strap two broken fingers together to immobilize them
  45. If you can’t wash your clothes seal them in bags for 5 days to kill typhus lice
  46. Damp dust weekly to prevent mite infestation
  47. Clean wounds however minor as soon as possible to prevent infection
  48. Never burst blisters it lets infection in. Blister fluid is sterile.
  49. Barley water relieves cystitis. (Boil grain and drink the juice)
  50. Cranberry juice relieves cystitis
  51. Spirits:  The higher the alcohol content, the better. Spirits can be used to sterilize instruments and clean wounds.  Unlike isopropyl alcohol, spirits can be ingested internally to dull the patients pain prior to an invasive procedure when anesthetics are unavailable.
  52. If you must lance an abscess use a sterile needle inserted at the bottom to aid drainage
  53. Flies spread disease. Clear all waste,  food, human and pet immediately
  54. Never give alcohol to hypothermia patients, it will cool them more
  55. Re-warm hypothermia victims with gentle heat and do it slowly
  56. Don’t rub areas you suspect to be frost bitten it causes more damage
  57. Prevent scurvy with adequate vitamin C
  58. Prevent rickets with adequate vitamin D
  59. Prevent spina bifida in babies with folic acid in pregnancy
  60. Prevent anemia with adequate iron intake. Cast iron cookware helps
  61. Prevent bone/tooth  problems with adequate calcium
  62. Prevent pregnancy by using natural sponge as a barrier to ejaculate
  63. Natural sponge can also be a reusable feminine hygiene product
  64. Razor Blades:  You might be wondering why the heck razor blades are suggested for the first aid kit.  The single most important reason is that in order to get a proper fit with your N95 or N100 mask , you are going to need to have a clear patch of skin.  If you are ever in a situation where a protective mask is required, it will be handy to have razor blades right there in your kit, ready to go. It also might be a good idea to have a hank of denim so that you can strop the used blades and gives them a near indefinite life.
  65. Liquid Bandage: Though this has become more popular, surprisingly, many people still don’t know about it. Liquid bandage, like New Skin, is just like it sounds: you apply a the liquid to a small wound and within minutes, it dries into a protective bandage. It’s good for keeping out dirt, germs and water, without the annoyance of a bandage.

If you can think of any other items not listed here that should be added to the list, please let us know about it over at: www.facebook.com/mostprepared

Things you’ll need for Sanitation when SHTF!

In most disaster scenarios or any kind of end of the world as we know it type event, sanitation is going to be a major problem. After an earthquake, flood, hurricane, tornado, in a war zone, or during a pandemic, your surroundings as well as your immediate area can and will be contaminated with germs, viruses and disease. That means any common or public area is going to be extremely dangerous.

Sewers and septic tanks are going to leak / overflow into the surrounding areas, they can potentially contaminate groundwater, lakes, and water pipelines. Without garbage trucks, dead animals and trash will quickly pile up and create breeding grounds for germs and bacteria. Most people will not dispose of their waste properly, and it will more than likely seep into waterways. Petroleum byproducts, oil, gasoline and the like from damaged or submerged vehicles is likely to spread into the earth. To make matters even worse, the increased stress of the situation will lead to a weakening of your immune system. So what can you do?

Ideally, you’ll want to stay inside as long as possible. But if the crisis lasts for long, you’re going to have to go outside eventually. Here are some supplies you should start stocking up on now (in alphabetical order):

1. Clorox Disinfecting Wipes – Great for cleaning any surface areas that are touched often.

2. Drinking Water – You’ll need at least a gallon per person per day. Two gallons would be even better because you’ll also need clean water to bathe yourself with. If you run out of clean water, you’ll have to boil whatever water you can find. A roiling boil for 1 minute should do it. (Rain water must be boiled, too.) If you don’t have room to store a lot of drinking water or don’t have enough fuel to boil water everyday, I recommend buying a Katadyn Pocket Water Microfilter. This will clean up to 13000 gallons of water before the filter needs to be replaced.

3. Feminine Hygiene Products – Self explanatory.

4. Hydrogen peroxide – For treatment of minor cuts, scrapes and burns. Can also be used as a gargle or mouth rinse.

5. Nitrile Gloves – Wear these while cleaning and dealing with waste.

6. Pampers Baby Fresh Wipes – These are great for cleaning yourself if you don’t have enough clean water for bathing.

7. Paper Towels – For drying off after washing yourself. Don’t just use the same cloth towels over and over.

8. Portable Toilet – You may need this if the water tap stops flowing. Don’t forget to buy some small trash bags to use as liners, or consider installing the tried and true ‘Outhouse’ on your property if you are able.

9. Instant Hand Sanitizer – Use it when you get up, after you go to the bathroom, before cooking, before you eat, basically all the time!

10. Regular Unscented Bleach – This kind of bleach has a longer shelf life, and it can also be used to purify water.

11. Toilet Paper – There’s an old survivalist joke that when TSHTF, toilet paper will be worth its weight in gold. I wouldn’t be surprised if this actually happened.

12. Toothbrushes and Toothpaste – Remember, the mouth is the dirtiest part of the body.

13. Trash Bags – You’ll need somewhere to put all those dirty baby wipes. You can never have too many trash bags, they can also be used to place any deceased animals found in/around your shelter into.

14. Rubber Gloves – You’ll need these for when you have to interact with potentially contaminated materials.

15. Learn to make your own soaps using wood ash as the base, this will help if it’s not a disaster situation, but a end of the world as we know it type event.

Remember, the best way to prevent disease is to avoid getting one in the first place. Wash your hands!

Daesh/ISIS/ISIL/IS Whats the Difference?

The main misapprehensions about the word currently circulating in our media boil down to the following list:

  • That daesh is an Arabic word in its own right (rather than an acronym) meaning ‘a group of bigots who impose their will on others’
  • That it can be ‘differently conjugated’ to mean either the phrase above or ‘to trample and crush’
  • That one of the words in the acronym also means ‘to trample or crush’
  • That it is an insult or swearword in its own right
  • That is has different meanings in the plural form

Read around a bit, across several UK and US broadsheets, and you will quickly spot the same misinformation being repeated almost word for word: publications are either quoting each other as supposed reliable sources on the story, with acknowledgments, or simply repeating each others lines without explicitly referencing them. In most cases, the explanation is not only wrong, it doesn’t actually make sense. But why all this speculation? Why so much mystery? Why are phrases like ‘rough translation’ and ‘possibly linked to this word’ being used, making the story out to be as elusive and contested as many of the political developments on the ground in Syria? Clearly none of these journalists or their researchers have accessed an Arabic/English dictionary (there are many freely searchable online) nor – even easier – contacted an arabophone, to check these basic facts.

So what does Daesh really mean? Well, D.A.E.SH is a transliteration of the Arabic acronym formed of the same words that make up I.S.I.S in English: ‘Islamic State in Iraq and Syria’, or ‘لدولة الإسلامية في العراق والشام’ (‘al-dowla al-islaamiyya fii-il-i’raaq wa-ash-shaam’). That’s the full name chosen by the organization, and – when used in full – it’s definitely how they want to be referred to. In Arabic, just like in English, that phrase consists of six words, four of which make it into the acronym (‘in’ and ‘and’ are omitted) : ‘دولة dowla’ (state) + ‘إسلامية islaamiyya’ (Islamic) + ‘عراق i’raaq’ (Iraq) + ‘شام shaam’. That last word, ‘shaam’, is variously used in Arabic to denote Damascus (in Syrian dialect) ‘Greater Syria’ / the Levant, or Syria – hence the US-preferred acronym ISIL, with the L standing for Levant. In Arabic there is a single letter for the sound ‘sh’, hence our transliteration of the acronym having five letters, not four. And the vowel which begins the word ‘islaamiyya’ becomes an ‘a’ sound when differently positioned in a word, hence the acronym being pronounced ‘da’ish’ when written in Arabic, and the ‘a’ coming over into our transliteration of the acronym. Of course the amazing Arabic letter ‘ع’ which begins the word for ‘Iraq’ is unpronounceable to an anglophone, and can’t be written in Latin letters, hence the use of an ‘e’ (or occasionally an ’e) in the transliteration.

Still with me? Nothing mysterious there – or nothing that anyone who speaks Arabic wouldn’t be able to explain. It’s not a previously existing word in its own right. It does indeed now mean ‘tyrannical, despotic, murdering fundamentalists who claim to be Islamic and claim to be a state’ but only as a result of how it sounds (more on that in a minute) and as a result of the associations that quickly attach to a neologism, in the same way that they have attached to the word ISIS. So it’s not based on any previous – or mysterious, or quasi-mystical Eastern – meaning.

And so if the word is basically ‘ISIS’, but in Arabic, why are the people it describes in such a fury about it? Because they hear it, quite rightly, as a challenge to their legitimacy: a dismissal of their aspirations to define Islamic practice, to be ‘a state for all Muslims’ and – crucially – as a refusal to acknowledge and address them as such. They want to be addressed as exactly what they claim to be, by people so in awe of them that they use the pompous, long and delusional name created by the group, not some funny-sounding made-up word. And here is the very simple key point that has been overlooked in all the anglophone press coverage I’ve seen: in Arabic, acronyms are not anything like as widely used as they are in English, and so arabophones are not as used to hearing them as anglophones are. Thus, the creation and use of a title that stands out as a nonsense neologism for an organization like this one is inherently funny, disrespectful, and ultimately threatening of the organizations status. Khaled al-Haj Salih, the Syrian activist who coined the term back in 2013, says that initially even many of his fellow activists, resisting Daesh alongside him, were shocked by the idea of an Arabic acronym, and he had to justify it to them by referencing the tradition of acronyms being used as names by Palestinian organizations (such as Fatah). So saturated in acronyms are we in English that we struggle to imagine this, but it’s true.

All of this means that the name lends itself well to satire, and for the arabophones trying to resist Daesh, humour and satire are essential weapons in their nightmarish struggle. But the satirical weight of the word as a weapon, in the hands of the Syrian activists who have hewn it from the rock of their nightmare reality, does not just consist of the weirdness of acronyms. As well as being an acronym, it is also only one letter different from the word ‘daes داعس’ , meaning someone or something that crushes or tramples. Of course that doesn’t mean, as many articles have claimed, that ‘daesh’ is ‘another conjugation’ of the verb ‘to crush or trample’, nor that that is ‘a rough translation of one of the words in the acronym’ – it’s simply one letter different from this other word. Imagine if the acronym of ‘Islamic State in Iraq and Syria’ spelt out ‘S.H.I.D’ in English: activists and critics would certainly seize the opportunity to refer to the organization as ‘shit’ – but I think it’s safe to say that no serious foreign media outlet would claim that ‘shit’ was another conjugation of the verb ‘shid’, nor a rough translation of it. Of course, that analogy is an unfair one, given the hegemonic global linguistic position of English, not to mention the heightened currency of scatological words; but there is a serious point to be made here about the anglophone media’s tendency to give up before it’s begun understanding non-European languages.

And obviously understanding things outside of English, and explaining them to each other via our (social)media hive mind is hugely important on many levels: in the broadest sense, it allows us to attempt to take our place as global citizens, and feeds our connection to other humans on planet Earth. Sadly, the story of the word ‘Daesh’ is neither the only nor even the worst example of anglophone media failing us in this regard. But there’s something specifically important in this particular story which is being overlooked as a result of all the lazy journalism around it: the use of this word is part of a multi-pronged, diverse range of efforts by Arabs and Muslims to reject the terrorists’ linguistic posturing, their pseudo-classical use of Arabic, their claims to Quranic authority and an absolute foundation in sacred scripture, as reflected in their pompous name. This ridiculous claim has of course been masterfully and witheringly deconstructed at the Islamic level, but at the secular level, satire is a crucial weapon in the fight against these maniacs: there is a fertile tradition of Syrian and satire as not only defiance but coping strategy, and which has been quite under-reported. In satirical Arabic media (and conversation) various diminutives of the word have also gone viral – elegantly diminishing their subject, belittling them, patronizing and relegating them to a zone beyond any formal naming in a single sweep.

Whether the word Daesh is insulting to its subject because it sounds ridiculous, or because it actually sounds sinister, depends slightly on who you ask. Some Syrians I’ve talked to rate the satirical value of the word very highly; for others, such as al-Haj Salih himself, however, the main weight of the word is not around humor, but around two very serious points he and others make. First of these is that both the shape of the word and the combination of letters in it are redolent of words from al-jahaliyya, the pre-Islamic dark ages or ‘age of ignorance’ that – as well as being a time rich in poetry and narrative heritage – has huge connotations of hideous barbarity in the popular imagination, being the realm of jinns and monsters and evil spirits and marauding freaks. This has also been overlooked in anglophone coverage, or been confused with an idea of the word having a previous set meaning in and of itself: as we know, it doesn’t. But given the connotations of this type of word, it sounds (to many an arabophone ear) very clearly like it must denote some crazed, bloodthirsty avatar belching back out from the guts of history. As al-Haj Salih very gently and firmly expresses to me by phone when I interview him for this piece, ‘If an organization wants to call itself ‘the light’, but in fact they are ‘the darkness’, would you comply and call them ‘the light’?’ The second, and equally important, point that al-Haj Salih stresses to me is another take on why a neologism is insulting: it’s an obviously fictitious name, for an obviously fictional concept. Once again, the movement’s claim to legitimacy as a state and to rule is being rejected as nonsense, reflected in a fabricated nonsense name for them.

So the insult picked up on by Daesh is not just that the name makes them sound little, silly, and powerless, but that it implies they are monsters, and that they are made-up.

All of this is why some Syrian activists therefore see it as so important that use of the word ‘Daesh’ spreads, and have been working hard to make that happen – so effectively in fact, as we know, that the word has been taken on by several global heads of state and their associated media, who have a limited grasp of the specifics behind the term. Originally hailing from the city of Raqqa, Daesh’s current Syrian headquarters, al-Haj Salih says his main goal in making a new name for Daesh was to avoid people getting used to referring to a tyrannical and despotic movement as a ‘state’. Although he regretted his efforts when the word was used by Assad, and although he was the victim of death threats and assassination attempts in Raqqa (he is now based abroad), on the whole he has been pleased to see the word widely adopted by the Arabic media since summer 2013. In terms of its use by global heads of state and media, he feels that this is only natural, and right, as ‘The people who suffer most at the hands of Daesh should decide what they are called’.

There is surely an interesting parallel between the refusal to use the name Daesh prefer, and our anglophone media’s misreading of the word itself – every article that recycles the same confused notions about the word denies the concrete meaning of Arabic, and relegates it to being a fluid and shifting language, inherently unintelligible.

It was noted in the Arabic press that the Spanish Secretary of State for Security, Francisco Martínez, correctly explained the link between the words ‘daesh’ and ‘daes’ in November when he made a speech requesting that Spanish media adopt the new term, and it’s easy enough to find that explanation in the mainstream Spanish press. Although the French media is not entirely free of confusion around the word’s meaning and origins – with some press articles clearly based on the same misreading of one or two sources as their anglophone counterparts are, or throwing in bizarre new angles such as that ‘Daesh’ is pejorative ‘in Lebanon’  – the crucial difference is that a quick search reveals articles in major French broadsheets that explain it without any problems. If other dominant European languages can get it right in their media, why can’t the anglophone media manage this little linguistic research task? Do we really live up to our stereotype of monolingual insularity this much, even at major broadsheet fact-checking level?

It seems there might actually be a systemic unwillingness to explain, on the part of the mainstream anglophone media – or, at best, an assumption that these things will not be explicable. How else can one interpret this total disregard that has been shown for the easy research avenues available to anyone setting out to investigate the story of a name? There is a vast community of bilingual arabophone people in the anglophone world, not to mention all the academics and people like me with a good acquired command of Arabic, very easily found and contacted. Even if that somehow proved too difficult, what about all the resourceful tech-savvy young researchers capable of, well, copy-pasting words into an online dictionary? More worryingly, this cannot fail to raise questions about the attitude to ‘them’ all this might reflect: is there something uniquely challenging for our media about Arabs and Muslims? Would we accept this kind of journalistic linguistic fog about, say, Greece? Have you heard that Syriza is a ‘rough translation’ of a Greek verb meaning ‘to wrest back power from a neoliberal global economic conspiracy of elite cronyism and structural inequality, and start a programme of radical resource redistribution and social justice, while wondering whether you will soon be ousted by a CIA-sponsored coup’? Well, just take my word for it, it is.

Homestead Seasonal Cleaning Tips, Tricks, and more!

How clean is your home? Let’s answer this question straight away: It’s not as clean as you THINK it is. After the shelves have been dusted, the windows washed, and the floors have been swept, scrubbed, and mopped, there are still overlooked spots where grime is hiding. Do you know where they are? Don’t worry! We’ve prepared our best solutions for helping you get to every corner.
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What Survival Gear is missing from your Medical Readiness Bag?

Do you have an Individual First Aid Kit (IFAK) and/or a Blow Out Kit (BOK), a Medical Readiness Bag (MRG) or just your plain old run of the mill first aid kit? Asking any survivalist / prepper / homesteader / camper / hiker / mountain climber, what their most important piece of gear is and you’ll hear a vast number of of answers, but the least common answer will be a first aid kit. To make matters worse, the kits that are commonly used are so poorly equipped or under equipped, they are almost useless.
Rather than a collection of loose items, we suggest per-packaging treatment kits using zip-lock bags. One sandwich sized bag could potentially contain gauze, bandage, butterflies, prep pads, and tape. Everything to treat one moderate sized wound.  You can easily put all the prepackaged bags in one layer of your BOK for quick access. In a single toss to a team member you’re able to pass everything they need to treat most soft tissue injuries.
You are far more likely to find yourself in a situation where you must administer first aid than in a self-defense situation, yet hardly anyone in our community would consider leaving home unarmed—so what logical reason could you have for not carrying a properly equipped med kit? Here is a list of the very basics of items that we suggest carrying in your IFAK.
Nitrile gloves
Nitrile gloves are like an armor-plated version of latex gloves that will aid in keeping additional contaminants out of the wound while protecting you from bio-hazards. You’ll never have a completely sterile environment in a real world emergency situation, but these gloves will help you come a lot closer?
Tweezers & Magnifying Glass
Metal shavings, splinters, cactus spines, moderate sized debris etc. sealed inside a bandaged wound can lead to infections. More humans have been killed by bacteria than bullets. Not to mention how annoying a splinter or burr is. Tweezers can help clean a wound where just washing and wiping won’t. In conjunction with the tweezers is of course the magnifying glass, if you can’t see the item in question that needs to be removed, you don’t know it’s there.
Sewing Kit
This may sound a little redundant but a sewing kit with regular thread, as well as waxed thread can be very beneficial in a med kit. It can be used to stitch wounds. It can be used to repair torn clothing such as cold whether clothing to help prevent hypothermia. The needles can also be used to lance an abscess, or assist in removing a sliver from beneath the skin, or in conjunction with a pair of tweezers to remove a splinter.
Battle Dressing Bandage
You need something more effective, then your kids sponge bob, and hello kitty band-aids in most emergency survival situations. You can get by, as people have done for decades, with gauze pads and a strip of cloth, also known as a Pressure Bandage, or a Battle Dressing Bandage.
Tampons and Sanitary Napkin
Sanitary pads originated post WWI, from the development of field dressings. Their larger cousin the tampon evolved from a fast bullet wound plug, to its current use to assist in blood management during menstruation.  They can absorb a tremendous amount of blood given their small compact size, when used in conjunction with the next item on the list, they can serve to treat a vast number of soft tissue wounds.
Athletic Wrap Tape
Instead of adhesive tape, as it sticks well, but not to hard to remove. Wide, can be ripped narrow if you need to. Purchased in box of multiple rolls, price is better.  Reusable so allows the wound to be checked, and re-covered until the skin starts growing back in. Reduces problems with proud flesh, scar tissue, soft new skin splitting open after bandage removal. Little to no scabbing. May have some oozy drainage that a sanitary pad can easily soak up. So the wound heals from the inside out, just fills what is needed for repair on the leg. I am real happy with this method. You put in a LOT of time with daily wound checks and unwrapping / re-wrapping and washing at first, but once the soft tissue closes, a few extra days of covering the wound with this type of wrapping can limit the potential reopening of the wound.
QuickClot
QuikClot gauze is used by law enforcement, paramedics, and military. This is not standard gauze though; it’s designed for severe wounds that won’t stop bleeding with pressure alone, like deep lacerations or gun shot wounds. You pack this specialized gauze, which contains a clotting agent, into the wound and then apply a pressure bandage. It’s important to inform emergency personnel  that you used QuickClot, because doctors will have to take certain precautions when removing it to properly treat the victim, otherwise, they could cause additional damage.
Non-Stick-Gauze
Gauze pads are handy in a variety of first aid situations—especially when used with a pressure bandage, but after suffering several serious wounds over the years, I’ve developed a special appreciation for the non-stick type because it makes changing the dressing much less painful. Toss about 20 pads into your kit in a Ziplock bag and you should be prepared for most scenarios.
Tourniquet
Tourniquets have gotten a bad rap but the last decade of combat in Afghanistan has taught us that reputation is undeserved. Eventually, every wound will stop bleeding; the only question is whether that happens before or after the victim is dead. Extreme injuries, such as severed arteries, or even limbs often require a tourniquet; without one, the victim can bleed out in a matter of minutes. Having one AND knowing WHEN and HOW to use it may just save someones life.
Nasopharyngeal Airway
An unconscious victim may be unable to breathe because their tongue and throat muscles relax and obstruct their airway. A nasal airway device (which includes lubrication) is inserted to provide a semi-rigid airway, aiding continued breathing. This isn’t a buy and forget type of item though, like the tourniquet its use requires training and practice. But once again, could potentially save someones life.

Notice: This is not a list of any sort in its entirety, this is simply a list of the bare minimal items we would recommend, for a BOK. Remember a BOK is not your average everyday first aid kit. This is more of a trauma kit or a moderate to severe emergency kit.
What are your thoughts on this list?
Did we miss something?
What would you recommend adding?
Tell us more in your comment below!
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Goat Milk vs. Cow Milk

Dairy farmers had quite a marketing plan back in the 1980’s that made them more than 13 billion dollars in recent years. With commercials touting milk mustaches and encouraging little kids to drink their milk (even if it’s chocolate, and full of refined sugar), should we question if cow’s milk is really that ‘good’ for the body? Many people don’t believe in drinking milk at all, but much of the world drinks more goat’s milk than cow’s milk, so what’s up with the American addiction to the cow? In this match of goat milk vs. cow milk, which will come out on top?
We begin life relying on our mother’s milk, and breast feeding research makes it clear that feeding babies with breast milk far exceeds anything made by any corporation. So perhaps our obsession with cow’s milk comes from this strange correlation. Maybe not. The bottom line, though, is that the rest of the world drinks goat’s milk because it is simply better for the human body.

Here’s why:

You don’t have to homogenize goat’s milk; it is naturally homogenized. Homogenization is a process done to cow’s milk to equally distribute the fat molecules so that when you purchase a jug from your grocery store it doesn’t have milk curd (milk cream) floating on the top of your milk. If you put two glasses of fresh goat’s and cow’s milk in the refrigerator overnight, the cow’s milk separates, and the goat’s milk does not. Homogenization of milk also causes fat cells to break, releasing a free radical called Xanthine Oxidase. As we know, free radicals aren’t good for you; they cause DNA mutations, among other things.
Cow’s milk sold in stores and not purchased fresh from a dairy farm is also pasteurized in order to kill any pathogenic bacteria, but this also kills all the good bacteria that contribute to healthy gut flora and proper digestion – of everything you eat, but also the cow’s milk you drink. Enzymes and vitamins A, D, and C are also eradicated in the process of pasteurization, and this is why Vitamin D is often added back into cow’s milk. Pasteurization kills the life out of the milk.
Goat’s milk is about 85% less allergenic than Cow’s milk, so people suffer intolerance less often. In children under three in the United States, milk is one of the most allergic foods
Goat’s milk is easier to digest for the majority of people than cow’s milk and most closely matches the milk produced by human body. The simplicity of digesting goat’s milk has to do with how fat is digested in the body. Basically, the fat molecules in goat’s milk are smaller, and therefore easier to stomach. Goat’s milk also contains less lactose, so there is less likelihood of developing an intolerance.
Goat Milk Advantages
The most significant difference between goat milk and cow milk is that fresh, unpasteurized cow milk forms a distinct cream-line at the top and goat milk does not.   The reason is that goat milk is naturally homogenized which means the fat molecules are smaller than in cow milk and so remain evenly dispersed throughout the milk.   The smaller size of the fat globules seems to make goat milk more digestible for some people but not all.   I personally find no difference in digestibility between the two.
While the protein structure of cow and goat milk is fairly similar, goat milk is missing an alpha casein present in cow’s milk.  In addition, when you drink a glass of goat milk and it reacts with the acid in your stomach, the protein curds that precipitate are smaller in size and a bit softer than the ones that form with cow’s milk.  This is another reason some folks find goat milk to be more easily digested than cow milk.
Cow Milk Advantages
Cow milk is higher is vitamin B12 which so many people are severely deficient in.  Goat milk also lacks folic acid making cow milk more suitable for homemade infant formula in the event the mother cannot breastfeed.
Cow milk is also higher in B6 making it a better choice for pregnant mothers who have morning sickness. My ex-wife suffered from B6 deficiency and morning sickness and found sipping fresh cows milk during the first trimester to bring almost immediate relief. Incidentally, B6 is destroyed by pasteurization so any sort of heat treated or pasteurized milk will not help in this regard.  The milk must be farm fresh and preferably grass-fed.
Cow milk is usually more readily available than goat milk and is typically a lower cost per gallon making it more suitable for tighter budgets.

And The Winner Is?
So in the fight of goat milk vs. cow milk, goat milk does indeed come out victorious. If you’re a milk-drinker, go goat.
Goat’s milk is just better for you, overall. It has a greater concentration of essential fatty acids such as linoleic and arachidonic acid than cow’s milk along with higher amounts of vitamin B-6, vitamin A, and niacin. The milk also has higher levels of bioavailable iron, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium which results in the restoration of altered haematological parameters and better levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH).

Sources:
http://www.raw-milk-facts.com/homogenization_T3.html
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/07/070730100229.htm

▶ “Survival” Mods

Always looking for new and improved ways to distribute the weight of my gear for every day use, as well as how to get the most out of my E.D.C. Check out the mods, and gear options listed below for some great ideas on how to mod out your gear with some of these ideas.
Let me tell you from the get go, some of these are just plain genius, while others are just scratch your head and get you thinking types of videos.

▶ What Goes in a Bug Out Bag?

▶ Top Ten Bug Out Bag MISTAKES!

▶ Top 10 Forgotten Bug Out Bag Items

▶ “Survival” Boot Mods – YouTube

▶ Chap Stick Keychain Mod Secret Stash Box

▶ 20 Paper Clip Hacks for Survival & Everyday Uses

▶ 20 Condom Uses for SHTF Survival

▶ 10 Everyday Items You Can Re-purpose in a Survival Situation

Get Home Bag EDC

Check out our recent Get Home Bag [everyday carry bag] walk through with Admin Chad H. from: Survival of the Most Prepared [facebook.com/mostprepared] and our group at: facebook.com/groups/sotmp
click this link to the video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bk_4Vn6SQO4

Junk in your Trunk? [Basic Vehicle Survival Kit]

When on you’re out on the open highway, you never know just where, when, or even what kind of emergency might happen. Even being an experienced, careful driver that takes good care of your vehicle, won’t prevent accidents from happening. Always be mindful of one very important face; there are all sorts of people out there, that just so happen to also using that same road, that alone should be enough to pack at least a few of the items listed below in your vehicle. There are also things that might occur that are out of your control. Like the old adage goes, “Hope for the best, plan for the worse”, making sure to prepare as best as you can for what might happen by stocking your vehicle with the right items, to keep you on your way to your final destination.

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Medical Preparedness – Burn Treatment

There will be times when no professional medical expertise is available. You’ll have to take care of yourself, your family, or your team, the best way you know how. When it comes to treating burns most people will aggravate the situation due to a lack of knowledge. There are many things that can cause burns, from heat sources to electrical wires, even UV radiation from the sun. Burn treatment isn’t overly complicated and should be learned by everyone.

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Hardtack: Survival Food for Survival Situations!

Hardtack (or hard tack) is a simple type of cracker or biscuit, made from flour, water, and sometimes salt. Inexpensive and long-lasting, it was and is used for sustenance in the absence of perishable foods, commonly during long sea voyages and military campaigns. The name derives from the British sailor slang for food, “tack.” It is known by other names such as pilot bread, ship’s biscuit, shipbiscuit, sea biscuit, cabin bread, sea bread (as rations for sailors), brewis (possibly a cognate with “brose”), or pejoratively “dog biscuits”, “tooth dullers”, “sheet iron”, “worm castles”, or “molar breakers”.

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DIY Handcrafted Solar Tracking System

The “Modular” design will allow you to construct any size solar tracker, single or dual axis, and adapt it to any type of device. Photovoltaic PV solar panels, Solar Concentrators, Solar Heaters Solar Cookers and even mobile and marine trackers are possible with our modular design. The new circuit designed by Mike Mladejovsky, PhD uses an inexpensive comparator integrated circuit and Darlington pair transistor outputs to drive up to a 1 amp DC motor. While this circuit can drive large motors it is also possible to build mini-trackers with input voltages as low as 3.6volts. The sun sensor is simplified using only six LEDs and the drive units are slew type designs driven by planetary geared drill motors which provide lots of torque and are self locking.

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Ways to store Meat without Refrigeration

Living on a homestead, or in any rural area, or preparing for a potential natural disaster. Being 40 miles from the nearest grocery store tends to prompt one to learn good food storage.  Some homesteaders have our own cattle, and tend to large freezer filled with beef, or are hunters and have that same freezer filled with venison.  Freezing has become the perfect modern way to preserve our precious supply of good ole’ meat.

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The Lost art of proper Food Storage

A generation or two ago, families had the good sense to always maintain a good food storage program because they understood that bad things can happen, not just in life, but also to your food supplies. After the great depression, families who survived learned the lesson of being prepared for just about anything. Since the late 80’s early 90’s when food, and other household products became more and more readily available (think Walmart beings pushing mom and pop shops out of town), America became complacent and assumed that there would never be a time when we couldn’t get in the car, drive to the grocery store or restaurant, and find exactly what we wanted in bountiful quantities at cheap prices.

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Defense Considerations: The Flip-Sides of ‘Op-sec’

https://sp.yimg.com/ib/th?id=JN.cv1SAAozQGj9zNVHha79lw&pid=15.1&P=0Yeah you read that right, many survivalist/preppers love to boast about their ultra super high level of OP-SEC. They even capitalize the term to give it (and themself) even more (self)importance.  Loving to boast about how no-one for X miles around knows of their survival retreat location or even their presence there. They revere the ‘Loose Lips, Sink Ships’  slogan. At the very same time they fail to realize how nearly impossible 100% op-sec in a TEOTWAWKI [SHTF] type of event.

They simultaneously boast of the resilience of their retreat and then turn around and refuse to disclose even the state it is located within.  They glow with pride about how carefully they’ve chosen their retreat location, and its remoteness from main roads and likely off-road flows of people too.  They mutter about ‘OPSEC’ meaningfully, and talk about keeping an ultra-low profile, and won’t even tell you what state it is located in. It truly makes me feel a bit like vomiting, when I see people quoting military terms, that they necessarily don’t know what they really mean.

Even worse is when they misapply them, or using them in the wrong context, or as a ‘magical invocation’ to give them powers of invincibility – as if merely saying the term is all they need to do in order to secure the knowledge of their retreat.

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Defense Considerations: How many acres do you really need for your homestead retreat?

Your biggest vulnerability, in a SHTF situation where you are living at your homestead and need to grow your own crops and manage your own livestock so as to maintain a viable lifestyle for you and your family for many years to come, will be when you’re out in the field and focused on your farming duties.

Maintaining any type of effective security of your homestead retreat will require more manpower than you could afford to spare during harvest time, and even if you could, you’d remain vulnerable to a skilled and determined adversary.  A better strategy is to create a buffer zone between the land you work and the uncontrolled land adjacent to you.  This buffer zone reduces the lethality of any surprise assault and gives you time to get to shelter or a defensible position, or regroup and defend your homestead retreat.

A sufficient sized buffer zone requires an enormous amount of additional land, we suggest you either rent out some of your buffer zone or settle next to other like-minded folk, giving you relatively safe and more secure boundaries on at least some sides of your retreat lot.

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Basic Dental Health Survival Kit Supplies and Oil Pulling

There are a multitude of reasons why we all need to ensure proper dental health. No matter hhttps://i1.wp.com/www.intelligentdental.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/image0071.jpgow high you think your pain threshold is, or isn’t. The pain you will endure due to a cavity, abscessed tooth, broken tooth, cracked tooth, or any of these that leads to an exposed live nerve encapsulated in your tooth. Truth me, even the biggest baddest guy you know, will be curled up in the corner crying like a little b***h with a skinned knee.

Benefits of a State Guard, State Defense Force

StateGuard

“It appears foolhardy to wait until a national emergency is upon us and the National Guard is ordered into the Federal service before at least laying the groundwork for a State defense force” – MG Ellard A. Walsh, president, National Guard Association of the United States, prepared statement to the Senate Committee on Armed Services, July 28, 1955

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DIY: Detail Your Own Car!!

Detailing your Cloth Seats and Interior Carpeting:

Do you have kids? Pets? Kids with Pets? In my experience any combination of this equation to be very results in stains of one shape, or form. Normally once every 3 months I do a deep cleaning of our cars, pull out the booster seat, and the floor mats and time and again, I am mystified by what I find. Stains, melted foodstuff, spilled juice, and much much more. I called around to some local car detailing shops, as well as those Groupon.com companies that will come out to your and clean your car. Needless to say I am way too frugal (insert: cheap) to pay someone else over $200 to clean my car for me. Continue reading

Everyday Survival Lessons from Single Parents!

Without a doubt, single parents often have to learn how to make do with what they have, which at times isn’t all that much. Partly due to less money coming in as there is only 1 source of household income, and partly because one person can only be in so many places at once!
Single parents have to learn skills that parents that have support from second parent may not have to. As a result, single parents tend to be nominally more self-reliant and crafty with their time and resources. Continue reading

Improvised Weapons, You may already have on hand.

When you find yourself in a survival situation, and I don’t just mean a end of the world type event, but a life or death situation. Your walking from the subway to the Park and Ride to get into your car after working late, it’s after sunset and right as you reach into your hand bag to get your keys, when all of a sudden your grabbed by a stranger. Continue reading

Red Flags when choosing Reclaimed Wood or Pallets for DIY/Craft Projects

Although the use of pallet wood is becoming extremely hot property lately, it also comes with some controversy. Before diving into the wonderful world of working with pallet wood, please educate yourself on the dangers involved.

Here are some tips and safety information you should be armed with before carrying pallet wood home for your own DIY projects. Continue reading

Federal Judge Declares Washington D.C.’s Concealed Carry Law has justification for an injunction to show it is Unconstitutional

Just months after Washington D.C.’s new concealed carry laws went into effect a federal judge has already ruled that part of the new law is unconstitutional. The ruling targets the district’s “may issue” portion of the law. As the law is currently written, applicants must show a need for a permit and they are being very selective with who receives permits. Continue reading

Prepare your kids for the future, NOW!

Research has shown that only 28 percent of children today are asked to do chores, a figure that is in sharp contrast to what their parents experienced when they were young (82 percent of that generation were expected to help out at home).

There are numerous benefits to children and their parents in creating a whole-family approach to getting household tasks completed inside the house and outside.

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